English Opens Doors for North Koreans

December 7 2017

Most of us have never had to flee starvation and oppression in our homeland. Currently, South Korea hosts about 30,000 defectors who have escaped North Korea in the last 20 years or so since the famine of the 1990s. Most of them had never heard of Christ while in North Korea, but during the process of passing through China and other countries, many have now heard the Gospel. Some have become Christians and even have been trained as pastors to reach out to their own people, as well as to those around the world.

Adventures in English for a United Korea (AIE4UK) started with a vision to help pastors and young people who came from North Korea to be able to communicate with the church around the world. It also helps prepare people domestically and internationally for unification, raises up workers who can fill the basic need for English education, and helps Christians from North Korea share their testimonies and the Gospel in English to bring spiritual awakening and revival to the Western, English-speaking church.

From July 17 - 19, 2017, we held our fourth year of camp at Seoul Theological University with the theme “A New Thing” (Isaiah 43:18-19). Susan Truitt, OMS missionary and English professor at Seoul Theological University, directed the camp, and a team of eight native English speakers sent out from OMS served as teachers.

This year, 10 North Korean defectors participated in AIE4UK, so they were matched one on one with the native English speakers from the United States. About half of them were pastors serving in ministry in South Korea, and the other half were young people preparing for their future. One activity they did together was going to the Yanghwajin Foreign Missionary Cemetery to learn about some of the early missionaries who came to Korea over 100 years ago and be challenged by their lives of obedience and service. In the evenings we heard the testimonies of some of those who had come from North Korea. It was a tearful time to hear of how God has been faithful through all of the terrible suffering they had gone through.


We believe that God has sent North Korean defectors to South Korea not only for the unification of the Korean people but also so that through their living testimonies of how God has guided and preserved their lives in the midst of danger, they can be used as instruments to awaken Western, English-speaking churches. We believe that if Christian North Korean defectors can share their testimonies and the power of the Gospel in English without having to depend on interpretation, God will use them in valuable ways.

For over 20 years, One Mission Society (OMS) in Korea has held Adventures in English camps every summer with volunteer native English speakers. These volunteers, devoted to God’s kingdom, raise their own money to participate. Through AIE4UK, jointly sponsored by OMS Korea, the Prayer Network for North Korea and the Nations (PN4N), and Sarangnaru, we hope that North Korean defectors may be raised up in a wonderful way to serve as missionaries in cooperation with OMS. The next AIE4UK is being planned for August 8-10, 2018.

By Susan Truitt, OMS Korea field director

Tags: north korean defectors, english ministry, unification of korea, english camp, south korea, oms,

​Compassionate Ministry to North Koreans

November 14 2017

Sixty-seven long years have passed since the Korean War. As relations between North and South Korea grow more difficult and North Korea’s nuclear threats increase, prayer is urgently needed above all at this time. We believe that in the midst of all this, God has a wonderful plan for the lost people of North Korea. Here is an overview of a few of the ministries you can support:

1. Ministries for North Korean refugees~Shelter ministries for North Korean refugees are taking place near the border of North Korea. One missionary was martyred for this ministry, but his wife is continuing this ministry. Prayers are needed for safety and fruit above all.

2. Ministry of food aid for North Korean children~A unique ministry of food aid for children is taking place through the cooperation of various organizations. As we hear in the news, many North Korean children are suffering from hunger, so prayer is needed for funds for this humanitarian food distribution for children.

3. Project to rebuild Korea Evangelical Holiness (KEHC) churches in North Korea~Before the Korean War, there were 134 KEHC churches in North Korea. So, local South Korean churches are being matched with them to raise resources to rebuild these 134 churches when unification comes. Prayers are needed for the fundraising strategy for this project.

4. Ministries for North Korean defectors~Prayers are needed for more denominational support and interest in the youth and educational ministries for North Korean defectors being carried out through the cooperation of Sarangnaru and One Mission Society.

5. North Korea Missions Committee~Through the activities of the North Korea Missions Committee, various forums and seminars are being held for North Korea and unification missions, as well as prayer networks, financial support, and participation in North Korea missions are being mobilized. Prayer is needed for more expert workers to participate in this ministry.

If you would like to donate to this ministry, please give here.

By Rev. Dr. Johnny J.H. Song, KEHC Missions Department Director

Tags: north korea refugee ministry, korean war, compassion care,

Piercing the Darkness in North Korea

November 7 2017

A few years ago, mission researchers produced a map contrasting well-lit areas of the world with dark ones. Based on the best data available at the time, dots of light were imposed on an otherwise dark map of the world. Each pinpoint of light represented a certain number of evangelical followers of Jesus. The result was a compelling portrayal of the areas of the world where there is relatively rich access to the Gospel in comparison to the areas where access is critically low.

South Korea has a heavier concentration of light than any other nation. In contrast, North Korea is strikingly dark. Knowing the Lord of the harvest does not desire for any to perish (2 Peter 3:9), what can we do to help more people in, and from, North Korea have access to the light of Christ?

Along with many other partners, One Mission Society is deeply concerned for the people of North Korea. Christ loves them and died so that they could have life. Yet, so few of them have ever had the opportunity to hear and understand the truth of Christ. By God’s grace and with his help, OMS is seeking ways to make the Gospel available to North Koreans. May the walls keeping it from them come down. And when they do, may God’s people be ready to blanket this dark nation with light!

~Bob Fetherlin, President, One Mission Society

Editor’s note: This is the first in a six-part series on our outreach to North Koreans. Stay tuned for stories of about changed lives and how God is piercing the darkness. If you’d like to donate to this ministry effort, give here.

Tags: south korea, north korean defectors, ministry, light in the dark,

Not a Glamorous Job

September 25 2017

Many people don’t understand why some missionaries chose to stay in their home country to work for the kingdom of God. The common thought is often: “Mission work is done OUTSIDE of the United States.” I understand that thought process. I used to believe it myself.

I thought that if I wanted to do anything significant for the kingdom, I had to get my Bible degree and a pilot’s license, move to Africa, and fly food, water, and Bibles to the rural tribes in need. That was my plan. Until God challenged me to “be faithful with those around me.” To be honest, I thought this challenge was more of a stepping stone. I thought the challenge was Jesus saying: “Show me you can be faithful here before I send you overseas.” Little did I know, he was actually preparing me for a role that I had never thought of – working with immigrants and refugees in the U.S.

God is showing me that some of us don’t have to leave home in order to be missionaries to someone of a different culture and/or religion. He is bringing millions of people from all over the world to live in the U.S. as doctors, farmers, cashiers, ministers, and as our neighbors. Foreign missions is still extremely important, but God is increasing the opportunity for us to literally do missions in our own backyard.

In my experience, I have built friendships and shared Jesus with people from India who are of the Sikh religion. My team and I have helped 200+ Chin people, from Myanmar, learn English while using the Bible as a part of their English class. I’ve helped four churches and several ministry leaders find ways they can minister to immigrants in their areas. We have also been asked to help send immigrant missionaries back to their home country so that they can share the Gospel. All of this took place within five miles of our home.

My wife has accomplished even more than I as she serves at the OMS World Headquarters as a homeland missionary. She works with all of the OMS missionaries to make sure their donor information is up-to-date, and ensures that all of our constituent’s addresses are well maintained. It may not sound like much, but every day she empowers missionaries in more than 70 countries to do the work they are called to do. She assists missionaries (both here and abroad) to raise millions of dollars so that they can continue their work. She does it all with a servant's heart.

What we do is not glamorous to the world. No one is going to write a book about us. We don’t have amazing stories of winning an unreached people group to Christ. But it’s the quiet, behind-the-scenes work we are called to do. We will happily and obediently assist others in their work as we faithfully serve the Lord in the homeland.

Jason Ferkel, Coordinator of Immigrant Outreach

Tags: homeland missionaries, oms world headquarters, mailing list, immigrant ministry, ministry to refugees,

​Not Alone: Maria's Story

June 16 2017

Down a steep, one-lane, curvy mountainous dirt road, across a little river, and up the other side sits a little adobe and wooden farm house. There are chickens, ducks, dogs, and kittens running around the yard. A hammock, table, and bench are on the little porch. Our friend Maria is always ready to welcome us.

We met Maria last May when she heard about the medical team that was in Chaguarpamba. On her paper she marked that she would like to receive a visit from us. The first time we went, we weren’t sure how to find her house. After asking around, we were told, “to go down the road and, where you see the big tree, that is where her home is.”

Maria used to live in Guayaquil, but when her parents were sick, Maria moved back to their house to take care of them until they passed, leaving her the farm. One day, she told us about her sisters in Guayaquil and how they were Christians. She shared that she used to enjoy going with them and hearing God’s Word. She prayed with us to dedicate her life to Christ and shared how her heart breaks for others who place their faith in idols that can't help them. She feels alone because no one near her has faith in Christ. I handed her a little card with spaces to be filled with seven names for people God places on her heart to pray for. She was excited to be able to play a part, through prayer, in the lives of people she cares about. Every time we go and share a Bible story with her and ask if we can pray for her she answers, “Sure!”

We loved being a part of bringing the Good News to her, and we hope to eventually plant a church she can invest in.

Maria's generous heart means we rarely leave her place empty handed. Even though she doesn’t have a steady income, she always has something to share, like papayas, oranges, and bananas. She invites us to go with her to pick the fruit that she wants us to take home. It is her way of saying thank you.

We are praying that Maria will have the boldness to generously share Christ like she shares her fruit; that her family, friends, and neighbors will know her by her willingness to share Christ; and that one day, there will be a church out in this little farming community of Achiotes.

By Jennifer Riggs, OMS missionary, Loja, Ecuador

Tags: loja, ecuador, ministry, missions, evangelism, unreached,

Beyond Babysitting - One Mission Kids

May 31 2017

People are often surprised at all the items we travel with for a One Mission Kids (OMK) event. Our SUV is often filled to the roof with storage tubs, background sets, hand props, tables, a media projector and screen, audio speakers, and anything else we can pack in. That’s because OMK programs are packed with high-energy music, missionary stories, Scripture memory, games, and a Gospel invitation. We strive to make every event an interactive mission learning experience, using every minute to help grow missionary hearts in today’s generation known as iGen (kids born after 1996.)

When you book One Mission Kids for your event, like a VBS, camp, school, mission conference, or workshop, it’s important to understand one thing, we are OMS missionaries, we are teachers, and we are trained evangelists, but we are not babysitters.

After attending an OMK closing program, one evangelist at Peniel Holiness Camp shared, “What you are doing in this room is undoubtedly the most important work of the conference. You aren’t babysitting, you are equipping these kids for future ministry.” —Rev. Gary Bond (Revivalism coordinator, Church of the Nazarene)

A mom of one of the participants shared this, “Sometimes a mom needs a break. A moment where she can sit and listen to the Word of God being spoken without a child pulling on her shirt, asking a question, or trying to keep the kids quiet while someone is praying. These moments became possible during our annual missions conference when Jason and Lora lovingly took our children on a missions journey. As parents, we want our children to learn and grow in Christ but sitting through a sermon isn't an easy task for an active 4-year-old. Jason and Lora don't just bring our children to another room to occupy them, they help them discover Christ and who they are in him. Each night, our son came home, raving about what he learned, practicing his verse, singing songs, and having a genuine excitement and love of learning about his Lord and Savior. Even now, a month later, he sings songs and talks about stories from the Bible he learned with the Campbells. Knowing he is learning in a way he connects brings joy to our hearts and a sincere gratitude to those God has blessed with a gift to teach them.” —Janelle Bowman, mom

While it is true that we spend most of our time with kids, we understand the privilege that God has given us to interact with these children, a responsibility we take seriously, even though we are big kids at heart.

After a decade of doing children’s ministry with OMS, Mr. Jason discovers that many of the kids he taught are now teenagers and young adults enthusiastically helping in their children’s program. “My 19-year-old still remembers Jason when he came to our church when she was very young! As my kids have become teens and leaders themselves in children's ministries, they've asked him to send them some of the songs he's done after they spent a week with him at summer camp.” —Donna Asche, Neshannock Alliance Church.

Currently, OMK offers a variety of mission-focused programs, many of which can be tailored for VBS or used as a stand-alone mission event for kids. OMK also offers workshops to help equip parents and teachers to grow their kids’ missionary hearts too.

For more information about One Mission Kids resources, email info@onemissionsociety.org.

To give to OMK, click here.

Tags: kids ministry, one mission kids, kids missions, children's ministry not babysitting,

​Reaching the iGenerations

May 9 2017

More than four generations of youth have been impacted by the children’s ministry of One Mission Kids (OMK). During these 10+ decades, every OMS missionary involved in children’s ministry has found himself or herself asking the same basic questions. How do we reach the present generation with the Gospel, and how do we inspire them to do the work of a missionary?

As unique as each individual child is, so is the generation they are born into. For example, the present generation of youth that OMK is reaching, Generation Z (those who were born after 1996), represent more than 23 million young people under the age of 20 in the United States alone. They carry the appropriate nickname iGen, due to the high-tech world they live and thrive in. This simple fact, along with the list of other unique characteristics of iGen, such as innovative thinking, increased access to information, and heightened desire for visual stimulation, is shaping and molding the way OMK helps to grow missionary hearts. Now more than ever, technology and visual approaches are key to developing programs and resources.

Recently, OMK developed a mission-focused evangelistic program entitled One Night in the Wax Museum. Jason and Lora Campbell drew upon what they learned about iGen to create this visually appealing and interactive program. It is designed with high tech visuals, sound effects, costumes, and props that are used to present the Gospel and challenge young people to take the Gospel to their family and friends. They have been able to share this dynamic presentation at events in both Pennsylvania and New Jersey.

How exciting to see God reach the hearts of young people as they respond to this interactive program. For example, one young man who trusted the Lord as his Savior, enthusiastically took the Gospel tool that was created for the program and immediately ran up to his parents and began telling them how they too can trust the Lord as their Savior. This is what One Mission Kids is all about, helping this generation to both hear and understand the Gospel and equipping them to reach future generations or, as we like to say, helping them to grow missionary hearts.

Statistics Source: Genhq.com, The Center for Generational Kinetics.

Tags: kids ministry, one mission kids, reaching igens, focused ministry,

OMK Through the Ages

May 3 2017

One Mission Society’s children’s ministry began more than 100 years ago when Aunt Julia Kilbourne introduced the monthly prayer coin calendars. The money collected supported mission projects around the OMS world. News articles were even written for kids in the OMS Standard publication (today’s OMS Outreach magazine).

OMS family conferences introduced the PALS program, allowing kids to rub shoulders with OMS missionaries. They also raised funds for OMS projects, which helped them learn firsthand that OMS is a family. Kids knew by name Pat Winfrey, Gwen Pinkerton, and Aunt Ruth Hunter (see clown photo).

Their use of puppets, songs, games, clowning, and exciting missionary stories brought missions to life every year.

In the 1990s, God burdened Susie Howard to bring missions to kids beyond missionary conferences through the quarterly Missions to the Max newsletter. Cartoon characters Otto the Missionary Sender and Max the dog joined the One Mission Kids (OMK) team to introduce each article. Each issue focused on a specific country or region, allowing kids to get a snapshot of what God was doing. A prayer and birthday calendar for OMS MKs was also included.

In 2004, OMK partnered with Men for Missions to produce the first Kids Can Do (and Big People, Too!) book (KCD) of 10 lessons to help raise funds for the Operation Saturation solar-radio project in Haiti. Soon, more mission projects were given the Kids Can Do treatment so kids could “experience” a mission trip at home, through the interactive Missions to Go lessons.

In 2006, Jason Campbell brought his audio skills to the team and produced the Music-to-go CD for kids. Workshops became a yearly focus with trips to EQUIP in Peoria to educate parents, teachers, and church workers to train their kids in missions.

In 2007, Jason created the MAXers summer program (previously PALS), resulting in the creation of the Good News Reporters, later released as a VBS in 2013. Jason continued his summer ministry of speaking at youth camps as a way to test the VBS-type programs. To date, One Mission Kids has developed 8 VBS-like mission programs.

In 2009, Missions to the MAX! morphed into an interactive website, allowing kids to explore the world of OMS. In 2010, when OMS changed its name to One Mission Society, OMS’ children’s ministry rebranded to become known as One Mission Kids. During this time, the Champions of the Great Commission book series began with the story of Charles Cowman.

In 2015, Lora Jones Campbell joined One Mission Kids, bringing her skills as an educator and curriculum developer.

This year, with the help of a cartoonist, OMK is updating the Missions to the MAX! cartoon characters for web animation to breathe new life into the OMK website. Mr. Jason and Aunt Lora continue the long-honored tradition set by Aunt Julia to find new ways for kids to grow their missionary hearts through the ministries of OMS.

Tags: kids ministry, one mission kids, vbs, kids learn missions, oms children's ministry,

​Rice Planter to Church Planter

April 25 2017

Jose Nunez, from San Leonardo, Nueva Ecija, Philippines, grew up helping his family on their farm. He learned to prepare the field, chose the right seeds, water, prune, and harvest the crops. As he learned the family trade of how to farm, he also learned how to gamble and drink alcohol at a very young age.

“I helped my family in the field in the morning and once we were done, I would gamble either by playing cards or cockfighting. This all changed when I went to South Korea in January of 2006 to work in a manufacturing company,” Jose related.

During Jose’s first month in Korea, he met a pastor from Pakistan who told him about Friends of All Nations and that he could meet other Filipino there. So, he went and met the pastor and some other Filipino workers. From that day on, Jose continued to go to FAN. As he learned more about God’s Word, a hunger to know more grew in him. Jose shares, “I kept reading the Bible and attending the Bible studies in people’s houses. Not long after that, I accepted Christ as my Lord and Savior and was baptized on June 7, 2007.”

The changes in his life were not sudden, but as time passed, he noticed there were drastic changes compared to his life before. His perspective on life changed, and all his vices disappeared. “My desire now is for my entire family, my friends, and relatives to come to know the Lord,” Jose said.

Jose met his wife at FAN in 2009 and got married in September 2010. They both grew in their spiritual walks through the ministries of FAN. In 2011, they returned to the Philippines and with the help of a pastor from FAN, Jose and his wife started a Bible study in their community and some of Jose’s relatives accepted Christ. They are now part of the local church in their community. My whole family is actively involved in our church.

In 2012, we returned to South Korea for work. Now his job is not located near a FAN branch. The company is located in a remote area and there are no churches nearby so Jose and two of his coworkers started a Bible study. Jose shared, “Now, we are about a dozen people who attend the study. Some are just listeners for now, but some are on fire as they study God’s Word.

“God allowed me to learn how to be a rice planter in the Philippines who cares for his crops and knows how to make them grow. Now, I use those things that I learned in planting rice to plant churches!”

Tags: philippines, south korea, farmer, rice planter, church planter, immigrant ministry,

​From Darkness to Light

April 18 2017

My name is Verrose Nunez, and I’m from the Philippines. I moved to South Korea in 2001 to work as an entertainer. I worked as a singer in a bar in Seoul, along with six other women. We worked from 7 pm to 3 am daily. Eventually, I quit my job and worked as a factory worker in Incheon to have a better salary and work environment.

In June 2009, friends invited me to attend a Friends of All Nations (FAN) meeting. My friends wanted to show me how God was faithful in their lives. The first time I visited, I felt the power of God and the love of the Christians that I met. After a few months, I accepted Christ as my Lord and Savior, and I was baptized on October 19, 2009.

My life was transformed from darkness to light. Since then, I have felt something different in my life. I learned the things that God doesn’t want me to do and also the things that he wants me to do, especially during rough times in my life.

I became a worship leader at FAN, and I was so happy that I was using my gift of singing to worship him and not to sing for men at the bar. God also led me to FAN to meet my husband José, who was a leader in the Filipino community. We got married at FAN in September 2010.

Just as the Bible says in Joshua 24:15, I promised God that my family and I would serve the Lord.

Through FAN, I felt the love and support of our pastors and brothers and sisters in Christ. I was far away from my family, but I didn’t feel alone because they all considered me as part of their family.

In 2011, I returned to the Philippines. My family noticed a big difference in my life. They noted that I was calm, content, and full of joy … totally different from the person that I was when I left the country. I am so thankful to God that he took me out of the darkness and brought me to light, and he also gave me the strength to love others. We soon started a Bible study through which my younger sister and her family accepted Christ as their Lord and Savior.

Even though my husband still works overseas, we are in constant communication with each other, and we always make sure that we are encouraging each other to grow more in the Lord. My husband, daughters, and I talk as a family through Skype. José and I want to make sure that our daughters understand the Bible and know God. As a family, we pray, read the Bible, and memorize and recite verses. It is hard being far away from my husband, but God strengthens me daily. I lead the youth and serve as a worship leader at our church, where my two daughters love to sing and learn Bible stories.

Tags: immigrant ministry, diaspora, south korea, philippines, outreach,