Sharing the Gospel 101

January 15 2018

When you hear the phrases “doing evangelism” or “sharing the Gospel,” what is your reaction? Maybe something like, “Oh, that is too scary,” or “Only missionaries and evangelists do that,” or “That’s serious stuff.”

Well, it is serious … seriously important, but that doesn’t mean it is too difficult for the average Christian to do. We as followers of Jesus are called to share the Gospel with our neighbors, coworkers, friends, and family. Most of us are aware of that, but how do we it? We want to help! Let’s get started.

1. Pray

Prayer should the first step in all that we do as children of God. Prayer give us insight, courage, and wisdom because God already knows where we need to be, who we need to talk to, and what we need to say.

Maybe you have a friend who is far from God and you’ve mentioned Jesus before and they rebuffed your attempt to share the Gospel. Ask God for help. Ask God to guide you in what to say and when to say it. God can also open your eyes to opportunities you may not even see.

Prayer is not just a one-time thing that we do, but it should be a constant conversation between you and God. Pray before you speak with that friend or stranger, during your conversation, and after. 1 Thessalonians 5:17 says to “pray without ceasing.” The Good News message cannot transform a soul without the work of the Holy Spirit.

Give it to God, listen for his voice, and then obey.

2. Engage

Starting the conversation can be the most difficult step, but it is also the most essential. How often do you cross paths with strangers daily and never say a word to them? At the grocery store? Drive thru? Gas station? How about in those silent elevators? Sometimes, all it takes is a friendly “hello” and someone is sharing their life story with you. Some people are just waiting for someone to actually notice them and begin a conversation.

As Christians, we are called to be a peculiar and compassionate people. The love of God should be so prominent in our lives that we stand out like a glowing star on top of a Christmas tree. It is not so much our “hello” that makes a person want to open up to the Good News message, but the joy, compassion, and confidence which our “hello” carries.

The perfect example of engaging with an individual is our Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ. Jesus began a conversation with the unlikely woman at the well and from that she was transformed and become one of the most powerful evangelists. We are called to step outside of our comfort zone and engage people in conversation, even if it is the last person we desire to speak with.

3. Listen

Theodore Roosevelt once said “Nobody cares how much you know, until they know how much you care.” One of the best ways to show someone you really care is to take the time to sincerely listen to their story. Everyone has a story and understanding what someone is going through helps you be wise about how to best present the Gospel to them.

The Bible says that Jesus was a friend of sinners. He didn’t talk over them or try and demonstrate his prowess as the savior of humanity. He listened before he spoke. He showed us what it means to truly be a friend of sinners … even unto death.

4. Share

After praying, make the person comfortable, and listen to them intently. They then will be more likely to hear the message you have to share with them. What needs did you hear when you were listening to their story? Do they need a friend? What about healing? Maybe joy? Truly understand who they are, have compassion, pray with them, and then share with them that God is everything they need. He is a friend. He is the great physician. He is joy. He is love.

Also, as his ambassador, you can be those things for the people you share with as well. You don’t have to be a trained expert in evangelism to lead someone to Christ. You just need the indwelling of the Holy Spirit and passion for the lost and hurting. Evangelism is not as intimidating as it may seem, it is really just an overflow of God’s love in us.

“When a man is filled with the Word of God you cannot keep him still, if a man has got the Word, he must speak or die.” ~Dwight L. Moody

Tags: how to share the gospel, tips to share, good news,

2018 Illuminate Missions Conference

January 10 2018

Tags: international conference, conference, oms conference, speakers, luis palau,

​3 Reasons Why You Need to Share the Gospel

January 9 2018

Sharing the Gospel can be challenging and can bring on all kinds of uncomfortable feelings, especially at first. You might feel:

Fear.

Anxiety.

Awkwardness.

Maybe even nausea.

Statistics would show that more than 60 percent of all church going Christians never share their faith. Here are 3 good reasons to be part of the 40 percent that do share their faith regularly:

  1. You live in a hurting, broken world .

Go to any news site or just talk to a few friends, and you will quickly discover that darkness is real in the world today. Right now, worldwide, 350 million people are suffering from depression. Cancer will claim over 8 million lives this year alone. Since you started reading this blog someone somewhere has decided that their life is hopeless and has committed suicide. Think about people you know for a minute. Do you know anyone who has had cancer or is depressed? Can you think of someone who struggles with addiction or maybe struggles with loneliness or self-worth and copes with that through sex?

People are hurting, sick, and lost. After the fall of man, sin became this cancer on humanity. It is constantly eating away at everything that is good in order to keep us hurting in the dark. Sin is the disease, and Jesus is the only cure. If you know Jesus, you have a light that can dispel any darkness. You have medicine that can heal any sickness. You have a love that can comfort even the loneliest soul. This is the Good News that the world needs hear.

2. You have a unique story.

In Luke 8, Jesus heals a man who had a demon tormenting him. In verse 39, Jesus said, “Return to your home, and declare how much God has done for you.” Jesus knew that he could reach the lost in his homeland with his story.

Throughout the Bible, we see the power in sharing testimonies. For example, Paul, who came to know Jesus in a drastic way, shared his testimony everywhere he went and with everyone he met, including King Agrippa whose father beheaded the apostle James and arrested Peter in an attempt to kill him. This is what he says after hearing Paul’s testimony, “You almost persuade me to become a Christian.” The beloved, John, writes in Revelation 12:11 that we overcome the accuser by the blood of the lamb and the word of our testimony. You have your own story of how you were transformed by the Gospel, and God will put people in your path that need to hear it. There is power in your testimony. Share it.

3. God has called ALL of us to share the Good News.

It is easy to decide that sharing the Gospel is for pastors or TV evangelists, but the truth is that God calls every believer in Matthew 28:19 when Jesus said, “Go therefore and make disciples of all nations.” In Acts 1:8 Jesus said “And you will be my witnesses in Jerusalem and in all Judea and Samaria, and to the end of the earth.” He didn’t say “some of you” for a reason. Sure, we all have different gifts and strengths that God will use for different purposes in his kingdom, but all of us, including you and me, are called to be witnesses of what he has done.

Sharing the Gospel can be intimidating, but once you overcome the initial fear and anxiety, it is incredibly rewarding. Do you remember what it felt like to be lost in darkness? Think back to what life was like without Jesus, without hope. Now remember what you felt when you said "yes" to the person of Jesus Christ. Remember the joy? Let that memory be a force that drives you to allow God to use you to rescue others.

“If sinners will be damned, at least let them leap to hell over our bodies. And if they will perish, let them perish with our arms about their knees, imploring them to stay. If hell must be filled, at least let it be filled in the teeth of our exertions, and let not one go there unwarned and unprayed for.” Charles Spurgeon

If you are now asking yourself how to share the Gospel, click here for tips.

To join the movement, go to Billion.Global Vision.

One Mission Society is the founding partner of the Billion.Global Vision, which aims to give a billion people an opportunity to hear, understand, and believe the Good News of Jesus Christ . We pray that God will take our efforts and multiply them so that over a 10-year period (July 2016 - July 2026), at least one billion people will have the opportunity to respond to the Gospel.

Tags: be the one, share the gospel, evangelism, share your faith,

History of a Special Christmas Carol

December 19 2017

I Heard the Bells on Christmas Day

This popular Christmas carol is based on the 1863 poem "Christmas Bells" by American poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. The song tells of the narrator's despair, upon hearing Christmas bells, that "hate is strong and mocks the song of peace on earth, good will to men." The carol concludes with the bells carrying renewed hope for peace among men. Many regard Longfellow as America's greatest poet. The first Longfellow came to the U.S. from Yorkshire, England, in 1676. Henry was born to a prominent New England Lawyer in 1807. He became a respected scholar and was a college professor at the age of 19.

Wadsworth had many tragedies in his life. His first wife Mary had a miscarriage six months into her pregnancy and died a few weeks later while they were en route to Europe.

It was seven years before he recovered from his loss to remarry. Together they had five children, but again tragedy happened.

On July 11, 1861, his wife Fanny had clipped some long curls from the head of her 7-year-old daughter, Edith. Wanting to save them in an envelope, she placed the curls inside, then melted a bar of sealing wax with a candle to seal the envelope.

Somehow, the thin fabric of her clothing caught fire, and Fanny quickly ran to Longfellow’s nearby study for help. He immediately tried to extinguish the flames with a small rug, and when that failed, he threw his arms around Fanny to smother the flames, sustaining serious burns on his own face, arms, and hands. Tragically, his heroic act did not suffice to save his wife. Fanny died the next morning from injuries. Longfellow himself was injured to the point where he was unable to attend the funeral.

Photographs of Longfellow taken or made after the fire usually show him with a full beard, since he was no longer able to shave properly due to the burns and scarring.

The coming of the holiday season in the Longfellow house became a time of grieving for his wife while trying to provide a happy time for the children left at home. It was during Christmas 1862 that he wrote in his journal, “A ‘merry Christmas’ say the children, but that is no more for me.”

He had also suffered another disappointment when his oldest son, Charles Appleton “Charley” Longfellow, 17 at the time, quietly left their Cambridge, Mass., home and enlisted in the Union Army much against the wishes of his father. The Christmas of 1863 was silent in his journal.

Later, Charlie was injured. He was hit in the shoulder, and the ricocheting bullet took out portions of several vertebrae. It was reported that he missed being paralyzed by less than one inch. Longfellow traveled to where his injured son was hospitalized and brought him home to Cambridge to recover.

But then, on December 25, 1864, he wrote the words of this poem. Perhaps it was the re-election of Abraham Lincoln, the possible end of the terrible war, or a deep, renewed hope that stirred in his soul which brought us this timeless message.

I heard the bells on Christmas day, their old familiar carols play, and wild and sweet the words repeat of peace on earth, good-will to men!” His original words spoke of “each black accursed mouth the cannon thundered in the South” and it was “as if an earthquake rent the hearth-stones of a continent, and made forlorn the households born of peace on earth, good-will to men!”

The music to this American poem were written by an Englishman named John Baptiste Calkin.

When published, this combination of British music and American lyrics quickly made “I Heard the Bells on Christmas Day one of the most popular carols in both Europe and the United States.”

Tags: christmas carol, bells of christmas, longfellow,

100+ Years of Ministry in Korea Continues

December 13 2017

More than 100 years ago, One Mission Society missionaries discipled, trained, and sent out two young Korean students, Kim Sang-jun and Jung Bin, from the OMS-established Tokyo Bible Institute in Japan back to Korea to share the Gospel with the Korean people.

From the beginning, OMS has been intentional about training the sons and daughters of a nation to reach their own people. This dedication has helped in the phenomenal growth of the OMS-founded Korea Evangelical Holiness Church (KEHC), which today has more than 3,000 churches and nearly 1 million members!

Before the division of North and South Korea, there were also about 3,000 churches in the north, with 132 of them being OMS related. And then the Korean War came, and those churches were laid waste while most Christians fled south to safety. Those that didn’t were most likely martyred.

Today, evangelism in North Korea (NK) is impossible. For the last 16 years, Open Door’s World Watch List has ranked it number one for persecuted Christians. Over 70,000 Christians live in prison camps as a result of their faith, suffering forced labor, starvation, and sexual abuse.

More than 20 million North Koreans live in darkness, having NEVER heard the Gospel.

North Korea is indeed a dark place, but OMS, along with our South Korea partners, is piercing the darkness of NK with the light of Christ. Here’s how:

1. We are equipping North Korean defectors.

Koreans have been a divided people for decades, but a gradual reunification process is taking place through the arrival of North Korean defectors in

South Korea. These refugees face numerous obstacles to integration into South Korean society, but they also provide valuable insight into the issues Koreans will face after reunification.

Our ministry partner, Sarangnaru, reaches out to North Korean refugees and helps them integrate into South Korean society by providing group homes for teens and young adults and after-school tutoring for elementary children and their parents, among other ministries. In this way, North Korean defectors and their families are evangelized, discipled, and prepared to make a valuable contribution to reunification.

2.We are equipping North Korean transients.

Risking their lives for a better future, an estimated 100,000 to 300,000 have crossed the border into neighboring nations. With discretion and care, we are evangelizing, discipling, and training North Koreans who travel to nearby nations to return to share the Gospel within their family groups and, when feasible, help plant underground house churches.

This holiday season, we are taking the light of Jesus into the darkest place in the world, North Korea. Will you join us in this initiative?

A small gift of $34 will evangelize, train, and disciple one North Korean to reach his or her nation for Christ.

Please help us give light to North Korea by giving online here.

Tags: north korea, south korea, ministry to defectors, give light, legacy,

English Opens Doors for North Koreans

December 7 2017

Most of us have never had to flee starvation and oppression in our homeland. Currently, South Korea hosts about 30,000 defectors who have escaped North Korea in the last 20 years or so since the famine of the 1990s. Most of them had never heard of Christ while in North Korea, but during the process of passing through China and other countries, many have now heard the Gospel. Some have become Christians and even have been trained as pastors to reach out to their own people, as well as to those around the world.

Adventures in English for a United Korea (AIE4UK) started with a vision to help pastors and young people who came from North Korea to be able to communicate with the church around the world. It also helps prepare people domestically and internationally for unification, raises up workers who can fill the basic need for English education, and helps Christians from North Korea share their testimonies and the Gospel in English to bring spiritual awakening and revival to the Western, English-speaking church.

From July 17 - 19, 2017, we held our fourth year of camp at Seoul Theological University with the theme “A New Thing” (Isaiah 43:18-19). Susan Truitt, OMS missionary and English professor at Seoul Theological University, directed the camp, and a team of eight native English speakers sent out from OMS served as teachers.

This year, 10 North Korean defectors participated in AIE4UK, so they were matched one on one with the native English speakers from the United States. About half of them were pastors serving in ministry in South Korea, and the other half were young people preparing for their future. One activity they did together was going to the Yanghwajin Foreign Missionary Cemetery to learn about some of the early missionaries who came to Korea over 100 years ago and be challenged by their lives of obedience and service. In the evenings we heard the testimonies of some of those who had come from North Korea. It was a tearful time to hear of how God has been faithful through all of the terrible suffering they had gone through.


We believe that God has sent North Korean defectors to South Korea not only for the unification of the Korean people but also so that through their living testimonies of how God has guided and preserved their lives in the midst of danger, they can be used as instruments to awaken Western, English-speaking churches. We believe that if Christian North Korean defectors can share their testimonies and the power of the Gospel in English without having to depend on interpretation, God will use them in valuable ways.

For over 20 years, One Mission Society (OMS) in Korea has held Adventures in English camps every summer with volunteer native English speakers. These volunteers, devoted to God’s kingdom, raise their own money to participate. Through AIE4UK, jointly sponsored by OMS Korea, the Prayer Network for North Korea and the Nations (PN4N), and Sarangnaru, we hope that North Korean defectors may be raised up in a wonderful way to serve as missionaries in cooperation with OMS. The next AIE4UK is being planned for August 8-10, 2018.

By Susan Truitt, OMS Korea field director

Tags: north korean defectors, english ministry, unification of korea, english camp, south korea, oms,

Give Light Video

November 28 2017

Tags: video, north korea, giving tuesday, givelight

Hospitable Love for Defectors

November 27 2017

Since the mid-1990s, more than 1 million North Koreans have died of starvation from famine and economic collapse in North Korea. Because of this, many desperately attempt to cross the border into South Korea every year. In fact, each year, more than 1,000 people enter South Korea. As of March 2017, 8,848 men and 21,642 women (more than 70%) defectors live in South Korea. Many of these women were trafficked in China, where they had children that they brought with them to South Korea.

Although the number of North Korean defectors is only about .1 percent of the North Korean population, each life is valued. We believe that interacting with those from the north gives South Koreans a foretaste of what an integrated society after unification will be like. We also see that when those who defect adjust successfully to South Korean culture, they become indirect missionaries to family and friends in the north.

North Korean defectors now enjoy better economic stability and are enthusiastic about education opportunities for their children to live a better life. But unfortunately, the drop-out rate for North Korean defectors is 1.4 percent in elementary school, 8.8 percent in middle school, and 14.4 percent in high school, over 10 times that of South Korean students! For most children and teens from North Korea, the hardest part of the school is adjusting to using English.

Many North Korean defectors experience discrimination and inhospitality, so they are tempted into crimes such as sex trafficking, and some even return to North Korea. The reason the over 30,000 North Korean defectors are not adjusting well to South Korean society and have degenerated into failures, lawbreakers, and vulnerability is that they have not been embraced with love and acceptance.

For this reason, Sarangnaru, a ministry partner of One Mission Society, run a group home and after-school classes, which show compassion and can be effective tools to maintain continuing relationships with North Korean defectors for missions. The ultimate goal of this ministry is to share Christ and build disciples for Christ.

Resources are needed to prepare for the coming unification and the evangelization of North Koreans.

To give, click here.

By Rev. Yoonhoe Koo, Sarangnaru director

Tags: north korean defectors, ministry in south korea, compassion, share gospel, persecution, famine, cross borders,

Restoring the Church in North Korea

November 21 2017

Did you know that before the division of North and South Korea, there were about 3,000 churches in North Korea, with 132 of those being Korea Evangelical Holiness Churches (KEHC), started by Koreans trained by OMS missionaries? But during the Korean War, the churches in the north were laid waste, and the majority of the Christians fled to the south.

Dozens of North Korean pastors stayed to watch over their churches while they sent their families to flee south. Many of them were captured and suffered greatly, finally dying a martyr’s death. In the following decades of continual persecution by the North Korean government, the churches and Christians in North Korea disappeared altogether.

One pastor, who in spite of his sadness over losing his father to the communists, has devoted his life to restoring the church in North Korea. For several decades, he has embraced his enemies, the North Korean people, with the love of Christ. Because of the mission of unification in the Gospel, although he is in his 80s, he is still working hard to restore the North Korean church.

Here is a passionately written except from a letter he wrote to his father, who was abducted by the North Korean government:

“What has happened to Shinuiju Dongbu Church now . . . father! Restoring that fallen church is my fervent hope and prayer. Someday a church will stand tall again in that place. Father, in that church where you shared the Gospel and pastored, I see a vision of your descendants sharing the Gospel.”

This pastor has been doing the dangerous ministry of setting up a shelter for North Koreans, sharing the Gospel with those traveling overseas, and training them to go back to North Korea. Because South Koreans cannot go into North Korea to share the Gospel, he has also been training ethnic Korean Chinese nationals and Mongolians who can enter North Korea.

There are North Korean evangelists who, in obedience to God’s Word, are risking death to accept Jesus while overseas and then return to North Korea. They are keeping the faith in the midst of persecution and danger, building the underground church and sharing the Gospel.

Among the one billion people that OMS is pursuing to share the Good News of Jesus with, there are 25 million North Koreans who have never heard the Gospel. They are waiting for someone to share with them. OMS has focused on training national evangelists in Korea since the start of the Korea Evangelical Holiness Church (KEHC) over 110 years ago. The North Koreans that we have discipled will rebuild the fallen North Korean church and bring salvation to the souls dying without knowing Jesus Christ. The North Korean underground Christians who have kept their faith through suffering will fulfill the task of being witnesses of the light of Jesus Christ all over the world. We ask for your prayers and support as this ministry is dangerous and difficult.

Rev. Sungho Kim, Sarangnaru adviser

Tags: north korea, reunification, reaching lost, gospel,

​Compassionate Ministry to North Koreans

November 14 2017

Sixty-seven long years have passed since the Korean War. As relations between North and South Korea grow more difficult and North Korea’s nuclear threats increase, prayer is urgently needed above all at this time. We believe that in the midst of all this, God has a wonderful plan for the lost people of North Korea. Here is an overview of a few of the ministries you can support:

1. Ministries for North Korean refugees~Shelter ministries for North Korean refugees are taking place near the border of North Korea. One missionary was martyred for this ministry, but his wife is continuing this ministry. Prayers are needed for safety and fruit above all.

2. Ministry of food aid for North Korean children~A unique ministry of food aid for children is taking place through the cooperation of various organizations. As we hear in the news, many North Korean children are suffering from hunger, so prayer is needed for funds for this humanitarian food distribution for children.

3. Project to rebuild Korea Evangelical Holiness (KEHC) churches in North Korea~Before the Korean War, there were 134 KEHC churches in North Korea. So, local South Korean churches are being matched with them to raise resources to rebuild these 134 churches when unification comes. Prayers are needed for the fundraising strategy for this project.

4. Ministries for North Korean defectors~Prayers are needed for more denominational support and interest in the youth and educational ministries for North Korean defectors being carried out through the cooperation of Sarangnaru and One Mission Society.

5. North Korea Missions Committee~Through the activities of the North Korea Missions Committee, various forums and seminars are being held for North Korea and unification missions, as well as prayer networks, financial support, and participation in North Korea missions are being mobilized. Prayer is needed for more expert workers to participate in this ministry.

If you would like to donate to this ministry, please give here.

By Rev. Dr. Johnny J.H. Song, KEHC Missions Department Director

Tags: north korea refugee ministry, korean war, compassion care,